Jewish Holidays

The ecology of Israel's festivals

 

Despite millennia of physical separation, there have always existed unbreakable bonds connecting Jews to the Land of Israel.

The explanation lies in both the collective historical memory preserved by the holidays of Israel as well as in the agricultural cycles of the land of Israel that are embedded in the three pilgrimage festivals: Passover, Shavuot, and Sukkot.

When the Jewish nation was forced out of its homeland and scattered in the Diaspora, it took with it its historical holidays firmly intertwined with the ecology of Israel: its unique agricultural challenges, landscapes, and nature.

In addition to the three pilgrimage festivals, there are holidays in the Jewish calendar that celebrate specific historical events such as Hanukkah, Purim, and the miracle of modern Israel's rebirth on Independence Day. Finally, there are also holidays rooted solely in nature and agriculture, such as Tu B'Av and Tu B'Shvat, which were by and large forgotten in the Diaspora and were meaningfully revived only when Jews returned to the Land of Israel.

Year-round, you are invited to celebrate the Jewish holidays with special activities and tours that combine each festival's historical significance with its particular agricultural and ecological roots.

Sukkot – The Festival of Booths

Sukkot – The Festival of Booths

Sukkot Exhibit at Neot Kedumim

Sukkot Exhibit at Neot Kedumim

Hannuka Festival of Lights

Hannuka Festival of Lights

Tu B'Shvat

Tu B'Shvat

Passover - Festival of Unleavened bread

Passover - Festival of Unleavened bread

Shavuot - the Festival of Weeks

Shavuot - the Festival of Weeks

Tu B'Av - a day of Meeting and Matchmaking

Tu B'Av - a day of Meeting and Matchmaking

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